Something Infinitely Healing

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature — the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.”
Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

A  stroll along Oak Creek while the temperatures are cool, and the tourists linger over breakfast back in the Village. It’s the time of late spring where baby birds are squawking from ledges , coaxed to fly by hovering fussy  parents. Blackberries are in blossom and promise a sharable harvest. The Creek is flowing clear, low, and forcefully. Light crackles and bursts as water flows noisily over rocks.  Hawks are watching. So are tadpoles.  I sit awhile with old friend Sycamores and Cottonwoods. Blue and red dragonflies tease and elude the camera lens. Creek-side is lush, green, and in shadows, while Cathedral Rock sits high to catch the sun. No Breaking News.  to unsettle this creek-side morning.  Most excellent to linger, to embrace this  glimpse of the magic that can be Sedona. Happy to share this morning with you. Peace and Blessings.

Today’s Music: Gordon Lightfoot : Beautiful

This Weekend in Sedona: The Illuminate Film Festival – May 30-June 4.

#WordlessWednesday

 

 

Todays Music: Cactus Tree -Joni Mitchell

We’re All Ghosts

“We’re all ghosts.
We all carry, inside us,
People who came before us.”
Liam Callanan, The Cloud Atlas

A perfect day of exploring to share with you. Bar V Bar Ranch on the  Wet Beaver Creek, a calm, peaceful,  and historically rich riparian area that runs as a tributary to the Verde River in Arizona, United States of America. It is one of my favorite areas to spend an afternoon, for the sounds of the creek,  birds, the remnants of ranching, the lizard, rabbits, deer, and snake; the easy green to the eye glimpse of the  pastures and irrigated terraced gardens of seven hundred years ago.  Worthy of Reverence Cottonwood and Sycamore trees;  And  over one thousand pectroglyphs, the oldest thought to date back to around 650 AD.

Petroglyphs are humans expressing themselves by pecking, grounding, and scratching into rock surfaces,  with a harder material creating   symbols, figures, and intricate designs–charming and challenging  the imagination of those who come to spend time with them.

This riparian area, abundant in fertile soil, animals, plants, and water,as well as a moderate climate provided an excellent choice for the Southern Sinagua, the creators of the Pectroglyphs. They  settled into this area around 650 AD, with villages of three to ten families scattered throughout the Verde Valley seemingly thriving between 1150 and 1300. Then,  fluctuations in climate had the Sinaqua consolidating their communities along the perennial creeks and Verde River,  to about fifty pueblos housing 20 to 100 families. By 1400 the entire area was abandoned. It is said that the Sinagua joined the historical Hopi people.

The pectroglyphs of V Bar V number over 1,032, in four main panels, and unique in their style from other Native American Rock Art.  Referred to as the Beaver Creek Style. Water birds, young girls identified by hair whorls, figures walking with back packs, as well as the pairing of many of the figures, indicate the Beaver Creek Style.  66 cupules also appear, deeper circular impressions ground within foot/paw, animals and human like figures. These are thought to be related to calling of rain and fertility rituals.

Ancient calendars, honor of the elements, crop and human migration cycles, rituals, rites, honors, maps, and events. In  truth, it is our own imaginations let loose at the V Bar V, that unveils itself to us in spending time at V Bar V. No one knows what the figures actually meant to the individuals whose ghosts linger in their art and in the very trees, rock,  and creek of V Bar V.  A most engaging ghost story to decipher.  Enjoy!

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Todays Music: West World Strings Cover:

May each and everyone have an excellent month of May. Peace and Blessings.

Do You Suppose She’s A Wildflower?

“Do you suppose She’s a wildflower?”

         ― Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland          

Earth Day:  Marches for Science is very popular this year, as is Climate Literacy .

Ole Mum could use a good attorney right about now.  The Environmental Defense Fund and  Earth Justice come to mind.

Mother Jones magazine provides an informative checklist to help sort through the maze of which organizations sound too good to be true and are, and what groups are doing good solid work and need support. I am beginning to frequent the The Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School   to keep up with the current US Governments hi-jinks with our Mom, and find it easy to navigate and factual, which is very reassuring.

This week’s WordPress Photo theme is Earth, and nothing says earth to me more than a  hardy, resilient desert wildflower.

Lyrid Meteor shower celebrates Earth Day, with North America the best place to view.

My hope is everyone received their invitation, and enjoys  their gift of some  time outside with Mother Earth today.  Peace and Blessings.

#Wordless Wednesday

#Wordless Wednesday