Hid Behind Anonymity

Way before Watergate,
Senior Administration Officials
Hid behind anonymity.
Bob Woodward

 

Over the past few years I have taken many photos of Ravens and Crows. They are common in the Verde Valley, can easily become part of the background of a day. On high tension wires, dark sky appropriate street lighting, strutting the length of the  petro station lot. The  garden wall, the tile roof, or atop the cypress trees beside a remote trail miles away. Ubiquitous.  Anonymous in their resemblance to one another.  Oracles hiding in plain sight, birdfaces in the crowd.  Recalling every word, action, and deed.

What a Rip Roaring Story unfolds when a  Raven steps forward with Deep Throat vocalizations, telling all that was seen heard, and observed.  In response to WordPress Photo Challenge of the Week: Anonymous

 

A safe and peaceful stretch of days to each and every one.

25 thoughts on “Hid Behind Anonymity

    1. Always appreciate your kind words. Thank you. This morning I captured some photos of a pair of road runners. I felt like Wiley Coyote from the cartoons trying to stay out of sight, while keeping up with them, and the camera still enough to capture a clear photo. Who knew birds were so hard to photograph! All my best to you.

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  1. Ah one of my favorite birds. (Just don’t tell the Hummers I feed daily also!)

    I don’t think I speak Crow but I have fed my crows for 40 years by calling them each morning…and they come. I know that sometimes crows will leave “gifts” for humans so I started asking mine to leave me a trinket of some kind…you know, a sign just so I would know they got me? Nothing showed up. That is until a few weeks back when I realized my crows were alerting me every time this pair of Bald Eagles were in the neighborhood. Rare for around here.

    I love Bald Eagles the best. (Just don’t tell my crows.) My morning crows started with the “warning” they naturally give each other when an eagle is nearby. But when I would go outside, I swear they would lead me either up or down the hill to where the eagles were perched, watching the sunrise or sunset. I know, anthropomorphism, right?

    But I am taking it as a gift just for me….

    Great photos!

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    1. Your comments are simply delightful, and really add sparkle to this photo collage post of mine. I try… and most of the time fail…to not anthropomorphize the birds and beasts. The Ravens often seem so intent on conversation. And they so often seem to be watching closely, every detail. I wonder if the Ravens and Crows have a vocalizations to describe to one another human behavior that reminds them of themselves.
      All my best to you. Thank you for your wonderful response.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I have been chasing birds for while now, find it very difficult to get them to hold still, except for the Ravens and Crows, who demonstrate either indifference to me, expressing some urgent message , or great patience and support in my wanting to photograph birds.
      Always great to hear from you. Thank you.

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    1. Indeed they are. Very territorial, but everywhere it seems. I read where they actually will use existing human fence lines in identifying their own clans boundaries, and will patrol them. Thank you for stopping by and contributing to the conversation.

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      1. We have pet crows here in our area. Every day, they wait for us to say hello, They sit on the roof, they forage on our garden, they protect our area. In turn, they get fed. I wish people would write more dialogue rather than merely liking the photos.

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        1. Thank you for your interesting response. I’ve heard of people keeping Ravens and Crows, and a friend once had one that he swore followed his families car to town and waited in each parking lot as they stop here and there on errands. Ravens certainly are vocal around here and seem to call me out of the townhouse some mornings with their vocalizations, gossip, and breaking news. Unfortunately, I do not yet speak the language fluently.
          All my best to you. Thank you for stopping by.

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    1. Hello dear Nancy. I have watched Ravens fly off with pecans in their mouths, drop them in the air, and then swoop around to catch the pecan again before it hits the ground. I thought the nut had been dropped by accident, until the Raven repeated the entire maneuvers several times and I realized it was playing pecan catch.
      Always good to hear from you. Thank you for stopping by. Have an excellent weekend.

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