A One Time Event

“Revolution is not a one time event.”
Audre Lorde

 

Audre Lorde, deep to the bone voice poet and feminist who championed the rights of the marginalized, comes to mind as I listen to the young people  speaking out and making their voices heard their visions and goals clear, and their commitment an honest one.  I am just thrilled at the groundswell of positive activism taking place globally. And the diversity of the voices is reassuring.

Peace and Blessings to Each and Everyone.

Music/News:  Tracy Chapman- Revolution

It Saves Going To Heaven

I hope you love birds too.
It is economical.
It saves going to heaven.
Emily Dickinson

 

Important March Events: 

March 8th: International  Women’s Day ‘ Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity. There’s a strong call to #PressforProgress motivating and uniting friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.’

Spring Equinox – March 20- On the day of an equinox, daytime and nighttime are of approximately equal duration all over the planet. Not exactly equal, due to the angular size of the Sun and atmospheric refraction. The word is derived from the Latin aequinoctium, from aequus (equal) and nox (genitive noctis) (night). For me it is another turn of the seasons, and already the sun is setting later behind the townhouse.

“March for Our Lives” will take place on March 24, 2018 in Washington DC, as well as with ‘sister marches’ in major cities across the United States. Organized by survivors of the school massacre in Parkland, Fla. to rally against the continuing mass shootings taking place in our country. The event will include “student speakers, musical performers, guest speakers and video tributes,” according to the National Park Service permit application, with 14 Jumbotrons and 2,000 chairs, and an expectation of 500,000 participants.

However, the Washington Post reported this morning that the ‘March for Our Lives’ application to the Park Service for use of the National Mall,  was bounced by an application by a  “a student group at a local educational institution. The film crew’s plans listed equipment such as two tables, two bikes and jump ropes.”

I suggest and believe that it will not be so easy for the current individuals who hold office in the U.S. House of Representatives, Senate, and Trump White House Administration to squelch an American populace of young people coming up (and the people who love them), that refuse to be at risk of  slaughter by assault weapons, simply because they desire an education and attend schools in the United States.

 A safe and peaceful month of March..to each and everyone.

News/ Music: Ohio- Crosby Stills Nash & Young

The Tranquilizing Drug Of Gradualism

“This is no time
To engage in the luxury of cooling off
Or to take the tranquilizing drug
Of gradualism.
Now is the time
To make real
The promises of Democracy.”
 
This morning  I read that old inspiring civil rights stump speech still so relevant today,  “I Have A Dream.”  Spoken  at The March On Washington in August of 1963 by Reverend Martin Luther King. These words still inspire and remind me to the marrow what a gift and privilege I have experienced and benefited from by growing up and living with a functioning Democracy as the system of Government. This speech reminds me of the constant vigilance and participation by every one of us that is needed  to maintain, protect, and grow that Democracy. Here’s the speech in it’s entirety, given to a crowd of over 250,000 people from all over the country gathered in our nations capital to demand their voices be heard and their rights acknowledged  and respected. This is a speech to read aloud to your Sons and Daughters, Grandchildren, Students, and Kin. We honor a true Patriot and important American  today in our honoring Reverend Martin Luther King.

 

I Have A Dream

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating “For Whites Only”. We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ‘tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

These photos are from a display I photographed at the Fort Verde State Park – Camp Verde Arizona on the history of the Buffalo Soldiers, created following the Emancipation Proclamation. Reverend King referenced in his speech.

A safe, joyous, and courageous week  for each and every one.

News/Music: Dion- Abraham Martin & John, Senate Judiciary Committee Testimony  of Glen Simpson- Full Transcript, Steele Dossier- Full Document, Facebook Finagling Increasing Fake News -New York Times

 

 

More Carefully Examined

“See now the power of truth;
The same experiment
Which at first glance
Seemed to show one thing,
When more carefully examined,
Assures us of the contrary.”
Galileo Galilei,

Raptor: Super B&W- Photo: JoHanna Massey Autumn 2017

Have photographed the raptors several more times since  ‘Unless We Go Alittle Crazy.‘ Photographing them is simply bliss, chunks of time fall away and by return home to peruse the newest images, I’m surprised to find the morning vanished too.

Enjoying the focus on editing several sets of the same subjects, each unique, experimenting with all the variations and editing options, often for the first time. The  focus and attention to details grows.  Today I am experimenting with the Black & White features of the tools.

In response to Krista Steven’s choice for subject in this week’s  WordPress Photo Challenge: Experimental

Galileo Galilei, Quote FromDiscorsi E Dimostrazioni Matematiche: Intorno a Due Nuoue Scienze, Attenenti Alla Mecanica & I Movimenti Locali

News/Music: Jeff Sessions, Puerto Rico/Cole Porter

Wishing each and everyone their  best and highest outcomes.

Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus

Experimental: adjective1 the experimental stage: exploratory, investigational, trial, test, pilot; speculative, conjectural, hypothetical, tentative, preliminary, untested, untried.2 experimental music: innovative, innovatory, new, original, radical, avant-garde, cutting-edge, alternative, unorthodox, unconventional; informal way-out.REFLECTIONS Stephin MerrittexperimentalStrictly, experimental music is a style of composition in which the actual sound produced is beside the point. Historically, it was a genre lasting from August 29, 1952, the day of the premiere of John Cage’s 4’33” (the ‘silent’ piece), until the 1974 publication of Michael Nyman’s book Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond, which negated the genre by defining its limits.

Other People’s Worlds

It’s fun to peek
Into other people’s worlds
And see how they go about
Doing things.-
Norah Jones

 Thought I would give everyone a peek into my recent mornings, by sharing images I have captured with my faithful companion the Purple NikonL830. Keep pushing it to do take images it simply can not stretch settings to do.

Remain enthused and joy filled about the invention of digital photography.

In response to WordPress Photo Challenge : Peek

Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus:

Peeknoun- a peek at the map: secret look, sly look, stealthy look, sneaky look, peep, glance, glimpse, hurried/quick look; informal gander, squint.

 

A safe and excellent good time to one and all.

There’s Hope

There’s hope
It doesn’t cost a thing to smile
You don’t have to pay to laugh
You better thank God for that”-
There’s Hope: India Arie

Getting out that door to witness and be part of this sunrise on the morning walk about felt baptismal.

Music/News

A safe and excellent day to one and all.

Dreams and False Alarms

“I pulled into the Cactus Tree Motel
To shower off the dust
And I slept on the strange pillows
Of my wanderlust
I dreamed of 747s
Over geometric farms
Dreams Amelia – dreams and false alarms.”
The high desert sky is big. I’ve seen it cower, awe, inspire, calm, humble, and straighten the shoulders on big guys and small children alike. These big skies will reveal when monsoon is coming, leaving, the heat is on, or off, snow is on the way, and which way the wind blows.  When there are large fires in California,  often enough smoke travels into Arizona, to add layers of colorful filtered light to the big sky sunset over the Mingus Mountains.
In all my years of observing this phenomenon, I admit to being startled by the massive scale of this color filled sunset. First time I have observed the entire big sky filled, and it’s message of just how large and deadly this last series of fires in California have been. The LA Times did a fine piece on where and how to help: How to Help Victims of Northern California Fires

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New Oxford American Dictionary:
scale 3 |skāl| 1 a graduated range of values forming a standard system for measuring or grading something: company employees have hit the top of their pay scales.the full range of different levels of people or things, from lowest to highest: two men at opposite ends of the social scale.a series of marks at regular intervals in a line used in measuring something: the mean delivery time is plotted against a scale on the right.a device having a series of marks at regular intervals in a line used in measuring something: she read the exact distance off a scale.a rule determining the distances between marks on a scale: the vertical axis is given on a logarithmic
scale.2 [in singular] the relative size or extent of something: no one foresaw the scale of the disaster | everything in the house is on a grand scale.[often as modifier] a ratio of size in a map, model, drawing, or plan: a one-fifth scale model of a seven-story building | an Ordnance Survey map on a scale of 1:2500.(in full scale of notation) Mathematics a system of numerical notation in which the value of a digit depends upon its position in the number, successive positions representing successive powers of a fixed base: the conversion of the number to the binary scale.
Photography the range of exposures over which a photographic material will give an acceptable variation in density.
3 Music an arrangement of the notes in any system of music in ascending or descending order of pitch: the scale of C major.